CHATBOX
zeldathemes
D3liRiuM
A little of anything and everything.
firmamente:

secret ravine ii by R.L. Sampson

firmamente:

secret ravine ii by R.L. Sampson

k641739021:

屋久島 縄文杉ルート 15 (by tomomega)

k641739021:

屋久島 縄文杉ルート 15 (by tomomega)

formulas-fatal-to-the-flesh:

Nymphes et Satyres
Charles Édouard Delort

formulas-fatal-to-the-flesh:

Nymphes et Satyres

Charles Édouard Delort

loves-elegy:

Endymion on Mount Latmus by John Atkinson Grimshaw 1879

loves-elegy:

Endymion on Mount Latmus by John Atkinson Grimshaw 1879

fuckyeahdurrsuits:

Have fun sleeping C:

fuckyeahdurrsuits:

Have fun sleeping C:

  #KYRRAHAF    #*LOUD DISTANT SNORTING*    #this is some fnaf bullshit  

heelerandthehound:

Azawakh 
photos by heelerandthehound

dai709:

original drawn by n.g. - Danbooru

dai709:

original drawn by n.g. - Danbooru

llbwwb:

(via 500px / Gulfoss -Iceland by Erik Kunddahl)

llbwwb:

(via 500px / Gulfoss -Iceland by Erik Kunddahl)

libutron:

Sword-billed Hummingbird - The only species of bird with a bill longer than its body
Found in South America, from Venezuela to Bolivia, the Sword-billed Hummingbird, Ensifera ensifera (Apodiformes - Trochilidae) has such a long bill (10-12 cm long) that to avoid toppling over, must hold its bill up high in order to balance when perching.
When feeding, they most often visit flowers that have long blooms that hang down, allowing them to probe the flowers easily from underneath with their bills still held at a steep angle.
Unlike most birds, sword-billed hummingbirds cannot preen with their bills, and preen using their feet instead. Because of this behavior, they have developed some of the largest feet of any hummingbirds.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jeff Dyck | Locality: Cuyuja, Napo, Ecuador (2014)

libutron:

Sword-billed Hummingbird - The only species of bird with a bill longer than its body

Found in South America, from Venezuela to Bolivia, the Sword-billed Hummingbird, Ensifera ensifera (Apodiformes - Trochilidae) has such a long bill (10-12 cm long) that to avoid toppling over, must hold its bill up high in order to balance when perching.

When feeding, they most often visit flowers that have long blooms that hang down, allowing them to probe the flowers easily from underneath with their bills still held at a steep angle.

Unlike most birds, sword-billed hummingbirds cannot preen with their bills, and preen using their feet instead. Because of this behavior, they have developed some of the largest feet of any hummingbirds.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jeff Dyck | Locality: Cuyuja, Napo, Ecuador (2014)