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D3liRiuM
A little of anything and everything.
crazycritterlife:

A poem from my goshawk:
"I scream when I’m hungry, I scream when I’m full,
I scream when I’m playing, I scream when it’s dull.
I scream when I’m happy, I scream when I’m mad,

I scream for all reasons and watch mommy go mad!”
(and what joy is had!)

crazycritterlife:

A poem from my goshawk:

"I scream when I’m hungry, I scream when I’m full,

I scream when I’m playing, I scream when it’s dull.

I scream when I’m happy, I scream when I’m mad,

I scream for all reasons and watch mommy go mad!”

(and what joy is had!)

themagicfarawayttree:

 Archival Print by amberalexander

themagicfarawayttree:

 Archival Print by amberalexander

fromyourdesperatefriend:

always-tuesdays:

The majestic Dumbo Octopus (x)

This is the cutest thing I’ve ever seen

darkestnation:

acrosstheuniversebitches:

scarlettjane22:

by Ragnar TH on Flickr

That is one majestic looking horse

The funny part is that I think it’s an Icelandic pony and those are lanky,  teetering little goofs

darkestnation:

acrosstheuniversebitches:

scarlettjane22:

by Ragnar TH on Flickr

That is one majestic looking horse

The funny part is that I think it’s an Icelandic pony and those are lanky, teetering little goofs

mindblowingscience:

Mystery Solved? How Birds Weather Turbulence

When a bird hits turbulence while flying, it can’t turn on the “fasten seatbelt” sign. Instead, new research shows that it tucks its wings to stabilize its flight.
Scientists were studying the flight of a captive Eurasian steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis) when they noticed a curious behavior. While soaring, the bird would often briefly fold its wings before resuming its normal flight.
Called wing tucks, these behaviors are not new to scientists: In fact, one of the Wright brothers, Wilbur, coined the term while spending many hours watching bird flight to improve aircraft design in 1908.
But the scientists began to wonder if the eagle’s frequent wing tucks somehow influenced its aerodynamics. So the team fitted the eagle with a customized, backpack-like harness equipped with a tiny, super-lightweight data recorder—actually a repurposed autopilot device from a drone aircraft. In this sense, the recorder served as the eagle’s black box, recording speed, altitude, pitch and roll, and a host of other information.
The researchers sent the bird on 45 flights through Brecon Beacons National Park in southern Wales, where they recorded 2,594 wing tucks. The data from their recorder revealed that the bird tucked its wings in response to atmospheric turbulence, according to the new study, published October 14 in Journal of the Royal Society Interface.
In other words, during pockets of bumpy air, the eagle’s wing tucks help keep it from crashing.
“When an aircraft hits turbulence, the whole thing moves. But a bird just tucks its wings and keeps a pretty smooth flight,” said study senior author Graham Taylor, a biologist at Oxford University in the U.K.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Mystery Solved? How Birds Weather Turbulence

When a bird hits turbulence while flying, it can’t turn on the “fasten seatbelt” sign. Instead, new research shows that it tucks its wings to stabilize its flight.

Scientists were studying the flight of a captive Eurasian steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis) when they noticed a curious behavior. While soaring, the bird would often briefly fold its wings before resuming its normal flight.

Called wing tucks, these behaviors are not new to scientists: In fact, one of the Wright brothers, Wilbur, coined the term while spending many hours watching bird flight to improve aircraft design in 1908.

But the scientists began to wonder if the eagle’s frequent wing tucks somehow influenced its aerodynamics. So the team fitted the eagle with a customized, backpack-like harness equipped with a tiny, super-lightweight data recorder—actually a repurposed autopilot device from a drone aircraft. In this sense, the recorder served as the eagle’s black box, recording speed, altitude, pitch and roll, and a host of other information.

The researchers sent the bird on 45 flights through Brecon Beacons National Park in southern Wales, where they recorded 2,594 wing tucks. The data from their recorder revealed that the bird tucked its wings in response to atmospheric turbulence, according to the new study, published October 14 in Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

In other words, during pockets of bumpy air, the eagle’s wing tucks help keep it from crashing.

“When an aircraft hits turbulence, the whole thing moves. But a bird just tucks its wings and keeps a pretty smooth flight,” said study senior author Graham Taylor, a biologist at Oxford University in the U.K.

Continue Reading.

jiritrnkapuppetmaster:

Rusalka(1997)

Director:Aleksandr Petrov

arrestus:

( Artificial Paradise ) Shot By

Salar Kheradpejouh

Salar Kheradpejouh Facebook

Salar Kheradpejouh Instagram

llbwwb:

(via Koala by Josef Gelernter / 500px)

llbwwb:

(via Koala by Josef Gelernter / 500px)